Building Your Birth Team: Part 2

building your birth team baltimore

Today, on the blog, we will continue the discussion about building your optimal birth team for support both before and after birth. Being fully informed and having the necessary resources during pregnancy (and beyond) could make all the difference in the beginning stages of parenthood. The previous Building your Birth Team post highlighted the importance of choosing your care provider, childbirth educator, doula and placenta encapsulation specialist. Below you will find several other supports that optimize your overall journey.

Chiropractic Care: There are many hormonal and physical changes you’ll experience during your pregnancy. Some of these will have an impact on your posture and comfort. As your baby becomes heavier, your center of gravity shifts, and your posture will adjust (sometimes for the worse). Also, this may create added pressure and misalignment in the pelvis. A misaligned pelvis may pose complications during delivery. When the pelvis is out of alignment, it can make it hard for your baby to move into the best position to be born, which is rear-facing and head down. In some cases, this could affect a person’s ability to have a natural , low intervention birth. A balanced pelvis also means your baby has a lower chance of moving into a breech or posterior position. When your baby is not in an optimal birthing position, it can lead to a longer, more complicated delivery. Evidence points to improved outcomes in labor and delivery for people who’ve received chiropractic care from a Webster Certified Chiropractor during their pregnancy. Chiropractic care can help balance the pelvis, allowing baby the room need to get in the most optimal position possible, while also allowing for a comfortable pregnancy. In fact, chiropractic care may even help reduce the length of time you’re in labor. Locate a Webster Certified Chiropractor, one who specializes in pregnancy and pediatric care, today!

Acupuncture: Many people sing the praises of acupuncture during pregnancy to ease some common discomforts such as back and pelvic pain, nausea, heartburn, swelling, and constipation. So how does it work exactly? Researchers have found that acupuncture points correspond to deep-seated nerves, so that when the needles are placed, the nerves are activated and the energy flow will regain balance. This, in turn, triggers the release of several brain chemicals, including endorphins, which block pain signals and help to relieve a number of pregnancy symptoms.

Clinical Psychologist: This support person cannot be encouraged enough. This particular birth team member will allow you to prepare for the birth as well as process and heal post birth as you enter into parenthood. Benefits of a mental health therapist encompass well being, which ultimately affect baby and partner’s well being. Becoming a new parent has the possibility of bringing in unexpected stress and anxiety. Having a safe space to process this can make all the difference.

Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist: This particular support involves biofeedback and exercises to encourage relaxation and strengthening of the muscles of the lower pelvis which have the tendency to weaken in pregnancy and through postpartum. A physical therapist measures muscle tone and the strength of muscle contractions, which give you the information you need to proceed with tailored exercises. After practicing at home, you can see the improvement at your next visit. When necessary, the therapist may use a massage-like technique called myofascial release to help stretch and release the connective tissue between the skin and the muscles and bones in your pelvic region.

Pelvic floor PT postpartum may: strengthen your pelvic floor, re-training your abdominal function, help libido levels or painful intercourse, and treat incontinence.

Adding these members to your birth team care for the entire person. Physical, mental, and emotional supports are vital in attaining the wellness you deserve.

Immune Boosting Tips for the Whole Family

immune boosting tips

It’s that time of year again. The sounds of coughing and sneezing can be heard in
every public place. Airplanes. Libraries. Malls. Grocery Stores. Work places. More and more
people start calling out sick and our children usually catch the brunt of it. Is there any possible
way to boost our immune systems and avoid some of this season’s sickies? Below are several
strategies to attain overall wellness for you and your family as the winter approaches.

  • Sleep. This is an area in which we can all probably improve. However, the
    benefits of ample rest are astronomical. While I realize my audience is
    mostly moms of youngish children, this could be a comical goal. Trying
    your best to attain 7-9 hours a night can reduce sickness and build your
    immune system.
  • Washing your hands. This task can also prove to be difficult when trying
    to get everyone in the household to become a committed washer-of-the-
    hands but this small trick goes a long way. When leaving public places
    especially, wash, wash, wash those hands (and even in between the
    fingers!)
  • A healthy diet containing foods with vitamins and antioxidants.
    Examples include: peppers and citrus (Vitamin A). Blueberries
    (antioxidants). Green tea (catechin). Mushrooms (vitamin D). Almonds
    (Vitamin C). Cruciferous veggies (Vitamin A, C & E).
  • Probiotic. Repairing your gut is your gateway to health, as nearly 80% of
    your immune system is located in your gut. Multi-strain probiotic
    containing at least 25 billion units is optimal. This will keep your levels of
    good gut bacteria up to help fight off infections.
  • Elderberry Syrup. The dried berries of the Sambucus Nigra plant are
    naturally high in immune boosting compounds that are specifically shown
    to help beat off winter sicknesses more quickly. Boiling down and making
    a simple syrup can aide in boosting your immune system. (See previous
    blog for recipe)
  • Garlic. Eating this has been used for hundreds of years as both a food
    ingredient and a medicine. Some benefits of garlic are reduced heart
    disease, improved mental health and enhanced immune function. Whole
    garlic contains a compound called alliin. This compound has been shown
    to boost the disease-fighting response of some type of white blood cells
    when they encounter viruses, such as the ones of the common cold and
    flu.
  • Vitamin D. Getting outside and soaking in the rays can be a bit of a challenge during those colder months. During the winter, the recommendation is to get 1,000 IUs per day. Some can come from food sources (think fish, cheese and fortified foods) but it would be very difficult to get all of it through food. Taking a supplement boosts immunity and wards off sickness.

When winter sickness strikes, it can truly take a toll on the entire family. Hopefully these simple tricks will aide in optimal wellness this season.

Virginia Apgar: An Advocate for Newborn Health

Virginia Apgar

The APGAR test, a standard newborn test developed in 1953 by Virginia Apgar, assesses an infant’s health immediately after birth. At 1 and 5 minutes post birth, the infant is examined and given a score based on the following criteria: heart rate, respiration, color, muscle tone, and reflex irritability. The term APGAR score is a mnemonic learning aid based on its inventor’s last name which stands for Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity and Respiration. By the 1960’s, because of its readability and effectiveness, this score was used widely across the United States. Now, it is globally used and adopted by most doctors and midwives.

This pioneering anesthesiologist worked effortlessly throughout her career to save countless newborns. Born in New Jersey in 1909, she became passionate about medicine in High School. She completed an undergraduate degree at Mount Holyoke College in zoology with minors in physiology and chemistry. She also played on multiple sports teams, reported for the college newspaper, acted in local plays, and played violin in the orchestra. Her teachers were astounded at her capacity to succeed.

She went on to attend Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (CUCPS) as one of nine women in a class of ninety. She received her medical degree in 1933 and began a surgical residency. The chairman of surgery at CUCPS highly encouraged Apgar to switch to anesthesiology. Anesthesiology, at the time, was given by nurses but surgeries became more and more complicated. This procedure then became a doctor’s specialty. Because the field was relatively new and unresearched, Apgar had the enthusiasm and grit to take it and run with it. And that is just what she did. In 1937, she received her anesthesiologist’s certificate and returned to CUCPS to become the director of the newly formed division of anesthesia and, in 1949, she became the first female full professor in CUCPS’ history.

This high position allowed her to research and study more in depth at Sloane Hospital for Women with laboring and new mothers. She soon realized that there was no developed way and standardized measure to asses the overall health of newborn babies. Mortality for children under a year old in the U.S. had been going down in this time, however, the rate of mortality for newborns remained the same. This was mostly due to the fact that doctors weren’t identifying the babies that were born at risk. Hence no necessary interventions could be put into play. This prompted the brilliant Virginia Apgar to develop the APGAR score in the 1950’s.

She went on, in 1959, to pursue a Masters of Public Health degree at Johns Hopkins University and soon after took a position at the March of Dimes Foundation directing its research into the prevention and treatment of birth defects. She was one of the first people to focus on the effects that premature birth has on an infant’s overall health. Today, the March of Dimes still works to prevent premature birth and is one of their top priorities because of the legacy Apgar left them with. Apgar published over 60 papers and continued to tirelessly work and research until her death in 1974.

David Rose wrote, on the 100th anniversary of her birth in 2009, “Virginia Apgar was an irrepressible and charismatic champion for babies whose wit and lively personality captivated everyone she encountered in her constant quest for improvements to maternal and infant health… it has been said that every baby is first seen through the eyes of Virginia Apgar.”

 

Source: www.amightygirl.com

Baltimore Clinical Herbalist Specializes in Women’s Health

Baltimore clinical herbalist

Today on the blog, we have an interview with Melanie St. Ours, an author and Baltimore clinical herbalist who specializes in women’s health and mental health.

How did your clinical herbalist passion ignite?

Even though I’d had a lifelong interest in natural healing, I didn’t have the courage to turn to herbs until I ran head-first into the limitations of our current healthcare system. It was 2008, and by day I was working as a massage therapist at a busy physical therapy clinic in downtown DC where I was the go-to person for clients with chronic illnesses, trauma histories, and other complex cases. Even with weekly treatments, I could see that they needed more options and that pharmaceuticals often didn’t work for their needs. Meanwhile, I was getting sicker and sicker with Ulcerative Colitis — and was shut out of the system because my “pre-existing condition” made it possible for health insurance companies to deny me access to a policy in those days before The Affordable Car Act had passed.

Seeing the ways that the system can fail people — both those with access and those without — made me passionate about becoming an herbalist so that I could teach people how to care for themselves with the medicines the Earth herself provides. I think of herbal medicine as a powerful complement to the medical system. The combination of both approaches is incredibly powerful, and we all deserve access to the best of both worlds.

How has this professional journey helped you in pregnancy?

More than anything, my herbal knowledge allowed me to enter into pregnancy in great health. I’m convinced that being well-nourished and well-supported was a big part of what made it possible for me to conceive right away at age 35 and to have a pregnancy that’s been pretty comfortable and uneventful. I’m at 34 weeks today and still feeling good!

What has been the most helpful natural remedies for you while facing typical pregnancy ailments? Inflammation? Constipation? Decreased energy levels? Leg cramping? (Feel free to add any others)

It was a shock when I started experiencing constipation since I’m a vegan and am fantastically regular outside of pregnancy, but my favorite flax seed stool softener has been a huge help! (And I plan to drink this during labor and early postpartum to help make that first BM after birth as easy as possible.) If you want to try it, here’s the recipe:

Flaxseed Stool Softener
(from The Simple Guide to Natural Health by Melanie St. Ours)

Ingredients:

1 heaping TBSP whole flax seeds
8oz room temperature (or cold) water

Directions:

1. Combine flax seeds and water in a cup or jar. Stir until all of the seeds are wet.

2. Let the cup or jar sit undisturbed at room temperature or in the fridge for 6-12 hours.

3. After steeping it complete, strain the seeds from the water. (You’ll notice that the flax water is thickened and gel-like, especially toward the bottom of the glass/jar. This is what you want!) Drink the water/gel. You can use the soaked flax seeds in a smoothie or on food, or simply discard/compost them.

4. To prevent constipation, drink 1 serving per day. To reverse constipation, drink at least 2 servings per day — one in the morning and one in the evening. You can increase to up to 4 doses per day if needed, and/or use this remedy in combination with Magnesium to enhance results.

I hope this will help you get some relief in the near future! If you try it for 2-3 days and don’t notice much change, I’d add some liquid Magnesium (or Natural Calm dissolved in water) to the equation until you’re feeling better.

I understand you have written a book that compiles your professional journey as a clinical herbalist. What inspired you to write the book? What is your hope for the book after publishing?

Well, the book isn’t really about my journey as much as it’s a guide to help others who are starting out on their own. 🙂 It’s called The Simple Guide to Natural Health and is designed to make it easy for beginners to get the most out of all kinds of natural remedies including essential oils, natural body care recipes, healing foods (these are some of my favorite recipes in the whole book!), and homemade herbal tea blends, tinctures, and treats. We’ve already sold over 10,000 copies and I’ve spotted the book “in the wild” at Whole Foods, so really my biggest hope at this point is just that it reaches people and helps them to start experiencing how amazing herbs are in their own lives. This medicine really does belong to all of us, and I hope that my work somehow makes it a little bit easier for people to get started.

 

Acupuncture and Moxibustion: A Dynamic Duo

moxibustion acupuncture

What is Moxibustion?
Moxibustion is a form of heat therapy in which dried plant materials called “moxa” are burned on or very near the surface of the skin. The intention is to warm and invigorate the flow of Qi in the body and dispel certain pathogenic influences.

Moxa is usually made from the dried leafy material of Chinese mugwort, but it can be made of other substances as well to achieve the same goal.

What is Acupuncture?
Acupuncture is the method of treatment based on influencing the body by inserting needles in the specific points of human body, called acupoints. The name originates from Latin and literally means “inserting needles” – Latin “acus” – needle and„ “punctura” – to needle/to stick needles.

Why are these two therapies often used as a pair?
Practitioners often pair the two therapies because it is believed that the two of these together can be more effective when the diagnosis allows for it, such as a breech presentation of baby.

 

How can this double therapy be helpful in pregnancy?
This powerful pair is often used in relation to breech baby presentation which typically appears around 20+ weeks of pregnancy. This happens in about 4% of all pregnancies. Many times, baby turns on his/her own and no further treatment is needed. However, when approaching the end of pregnancy with a breech baby, these two ancient Chinese therapies could find themselves extremely useful! A study in 2009 showed that these two methods were, in fact, effective in changing the presentation of the baby.

The conclusion of the study is as follows: Acupuncture plus moxibustion is more effective than observation in revolving fetuses in breech presentation. Such a method appears to be a valid option for women willing to experience a natural birth.

Using Elderberry to Boost Your Child’s Immunity

Having sick kids is nothing we look forward to come winter time. Snotty noses, unstoppable coughing, and grumpy attitudes. Not to mention the worrying a mama goes through about the illness. It’s truly a lose-lose situation. And then if mama gets sick, then the whole ship sinks.

This winter, I wanted to try to give my family the tools we needed to avoid those cold induced ear infections and the terrible flu virus that often plagues our communities. Because for me, staying quarantined the entire winter is not an option. We have to get out and moving, in public places even, where those big, bad, ugly germs are lurking.

The most potent tool in my arsenal right now is my Homemade Elderberry Syrup. I priced some already made syrups online and thought they were outrageously priced for such a small bottle. So, after reading the amazing benefits online, I knew I had to make it myself and cut back on some of the cost. Also, it makes you feel like a total mom boss when you can boil down berries and yield a substance to boosts your child’s immunity.

The first step is finding a quality, dried, organic elderberry online to use as your base of the syrup. The same rings true for honey. You will need a good local honey that contains the area’s pollen and seasonal allergens. This will also aid in cough suppression.
Organic Elderberry
Raw, Local Honey

Then you will boil a third of a cup of dried elderberries with three cups of water. Add a few shakes of cinnamon and clove and a tablespoon or so of fresh ginger and boil until the liquid decreases by half and looks more like a syrup. Wait for it to cool and then use a fine sieve to strain in a jar. Cool completely and add a cup of honey. TADA! You did it. Your very own elderberry to build that immunity in the whole family.

According to Dr. Google, the recommended dosage is a teaspoon for children and a tablespoon for adults daily during the week. Take the weekend off.
**Remember a child under 12 months of age should not consume honey.**

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